Tag Archives: Peter

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Embracing the Hope of Our Identity in Christ

The apostle Peter offers a profound summary of our identity in Christ in 1 Peter 2:9-10. In the process, he uncovers a wellspring of hope for everyone who follows Christ.

But you are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, His own special people, that you may proclaim the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light; who once were not a people but are now the people of God, who had not obtained mercy but now have obtained mercy.

Trace Your Path

In the first place, no one can appreciate the light like those who have been in darkness. The apostle Paul encourages to forget “those things which are behind” (Philippians 3:13). But sometimes a backward glance can help us appreciate just how far we’ve come.

How has your life changed since you gave it to Christ? What differences do you see in yourself? What differences do other people notice? By taking measure of what God already has done in your life, you can light the spark of hope as to what your future holds.

Find Your Strength

In the second place, Peter was writing to a church that was being persecuted. They had little obvious reason to hope. Yet Peter is firm in his assurance that God will fully equip His own to face opposition and challenges. When our strength and endurance falters, God will renew us. He will re-energize us. He will give us what we need to stand strong and thrive.

Energize Your Worship

In the third place, our very calling is hopeful in nature. According to Peter, our job is to “proclaim the praises” of God—to worship Him with everything we’ve got. In order to do that, however, we need to understand God, to get a sense of who He is and what He’s done.

We need to take a fresh look at His creation, the wonders and intricacies of His loving design. We need to immerse ourselves in the stories and passages of the Bible that reveal aspects of God’s nature and detail His awe-inspiring works. We need to talk to others about God’s work in their lives. We need to read the words of the psalmists and others who committed themselves to worship—men and women who were inspired to write words like this:

When I consider Your heavens, the work of Your fingers,
The moon and the stars, which You have ordained,
What is man that You are mindful of him,
And the son of man that You visit him?

Psalm 8:3-4

The more we learn about what God has done, the more we understand about what He’s capable of. How He brings ultimate good from even the worst circumstances. The more we immerse ourselves in the business of worship, the more hope we will ultimately find.

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Claiming the Bible’s Legacy of Hope

Offering Hope to the Next Generation

Surviving and Thriving in an Anxiety-Filled Culture

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What Does God Want Us to Understand About Community?

The New King James Study Bible shines a spotlight on the apostle Paul’s call for fellowship and unity in his letters to the Corinthian church. This timely emphasis resonates powerfully in a culture so full of division and entrenched opposition.

A closer look at the apostle Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians reveals three key principles we need to understand as we work to build harmony and unity in our relationships—especially in our relationships with other believers.

Sowing Disunity Is a Potent Battle Strategy

The apostle Peter warns us that our enemy “the devil walks about like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour” (1 Peter 5:8). Think of disunity as his tenderizer; it makes the devouring easier.

The body of Christ, working together, is a force to be reckoned with—and a threat to our enemy. Individually, however, the various parts of that body are limited and ineffective. We’re vulnerable to attack.

That’s why Paul made such an urgent plea to the Corinthians:

Now I plead with you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you all speak the same thing, and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgment (1 Cor. 1:10).

 

Disunity Comes More Easily Than We Might Care to Admit

In 1 Corinthians 1:4–9, Paul reminds the Corinthian believers of the experiences they shared and the blessings they enjoyed together—things that should have united them and given them a common purpose. They received the grace of Christ. They were enriched spiritually by some of the most prominent teachers of the day.

The fact that the church still found a reason to splinter underscores just how fragile and difficult unity can be. Unity often calls for us to set aside our personal preferences and opinions for the greater good of the group. That’s a tall order

When you factor in personality clashes and differing approaches to conflict, the level of difficulty increases further. Unity is a fragile thing—something that must be monitored closely, discussed frequently, and adjusted proactively.

Leaders Must Be Held to a High Standard

It’s no coincidence that the disunity in the Corinthian church had its roots in issues of leadership. According to Paul, some Corinthian believers declared their loyalty to him; others declared their loyalty to Apollos and Cephas (Peter).

Many people have an affinity for strong leaders. Under the right circumstances, some are even willing to suspend their own judgment in service to a leader. That’s why the principle of “to whom much is given, much is expected” is threaded into the concept of Christian leadership. Christian leaders are the first line of defense against disunity. Their words must unify, not divide.

Paul emphasizes the importance of unity by puncturing the pretensions of leadership. According to him, the names of the individual messengers—Apollos, Peter, and even Paul—are ultimately unimportant. All that matters is the name of the one whose message they are delivering: Jesus Christ. He is our common ground. He is the unshakable foundation on which we can build unity.

Who then is Paul, and who is Apollos, but ministers through whom you believed, as the Lord gave to each one? I planted, Apollos watered, but God gave the increase. So then neither he who plants is anything, nor he who waters, but God who gives the increase. Now he who plants and he who waters are one, and each one will receive his own reward according to his own labor. – 1 Corinthians 3:5-8

 

 

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This commentary is from the New King James Study Bible. With more than 2 million copies sold, it’s no secret that the NKJV Study Bible is a reliable guide for your journey into God’s Word. This Bible provides a complete resource for study, including thousands of notes, articles, extensive cross-references, and features contributed by top evangelical scholars.

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