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Facts About the Resurrection: Free Infographic

List of 10 facts of the Resurrection of Christ

Make sure you check out these related articles:

Facts About the Resurrection
Five Things to Know About the Resurrection of Christ
Why Christ’s Resurrection Should Matter to You
How Do We Teach People About Easter?

 

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Five Things to Know About the Resurrection of Christ

He is not here: for he is risen, as he said. Come, see the place where the Lord lay. – Matthew 28:6 (KJV)

 

Because of the Resurrection, Christians receive both eternal life (John 11:25) and spiritual power (Eph. 1:19, 20). Christ’s resurrection also provides for the future resurrection of believers (1 Cor. 15:20) and is the key to victory in life because of the union with Christ (Eph. 2:6).

5 Things to Know About the Resurrection of Christ:

  1. The Resurrection was the the physical renewing of His life.
  2. The Resurrection accomplished the reunion of His body and His spirit.
  3. The Resurrection established the subjugation of death under Him.
  4. The Resurrection resulted in the attainment of His new position.
  5. Through the Resurrection, He received a transfigured body.

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This was a short excerpt from the King James Study Bible, Full-Color Edition.

Standing apart from all other KJV study Bibles on the marketthe King James Study Bible, Full Color Edition is the only Bible featuring extensive commentary, doctrinal notes, archaeological insights, and time-tested study aids developed exclusively for the King James Version.

 

Facts About the Resurrection

Why Christ’s Resurrection Should Matter to You

Five Ways You Can Make God’s Love Real to Others

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Facts About the Resurrection

The resurrection of Christ was proclaimed eagerly by the early church. This miracle was considered an essential part of the gospel message. Surely Christ had died, but more importantly, He had been raised. More than just a suffering Savior, Jesus is our living Lord.

Here are 10 facts about Christ’s resurrection that Paul highlighted in 1 Corinthians.

1 Corinthians 15:4

Christ’s resurrection was prophesied in the Old Testament Scriptures (Ps. 16:10).

1 Corinthians 15:5 – 8

The risen Christ appeared to more than five hundred witnesses, including Paul.

1 Corinthians 15:14, 15

If Jesus did not rise from the dead, the gospel message is pointless, empty, and dishonest. Jesus Christ would not be alive, interceding for us, and we would not be able to place our hope in a glorious future with Him. The Resurrection is central to the gospel.

1 Corinthians 15:17–19

According to Paul, “if Christ is not risen, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins” (15:17; see Rom. 4:25). Christ’s resurrection, not merely His death on the Cross, secured our justification. His resurrection was a sign of God’s approval of Christ’s sacrifice for our sins. In short, no Resurrection equals no forgiveness of sin.

1 Corinthians 15:20 –26

The resurrection of Christ was designed to reveal what lies ahead for those who put their trust in Jesus (15:20 –57). Paul called Christ “the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep” (15:20). This Old Testament image (see Ex. 23:16 –19) means that Christ serves as both an example and a guarantee of what we can expect. Because He has conquered death (15:26, 27, 54 –57), we need not fear death. Because He now enjoys a glorified body, we also can expect to inherit a “spiritual body” (15:44 – 46) after this mortal one wears out.

1 Corinthians 15:42

Our dead, physical body will one day be resurrected.

1 Corinthians 15:43, 44

We will once again be both material and immaterial beings, our soul being reunited with our resurrected body.

1 Corinthians 15:45

The power behind this marvelous, yet mysterious, event is Jesus, the self-declared “resurrection and the life” (John 11:25).

1 Corinthians 15:51–54

Our physical body will be altered and changed to prepare us for the life to come. If Jesus is the prototype, we will still be recognizable, but our new body will be capable of supernatural activities (see Luke 24:31, 36, 51).

1 Corinthians 15:53

Our resurrection will take place when Jesus returns (see 1 Thess. 4:13 –18).

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This commentary is from the New King James Study Bible. With more than 2 million copies sold, it’s no secret that the NKJV Study Bible is a reliable guide for your journey into God’s Word. This Bible provides a complete resource for study, including thousands of notes, articles, extensive cross-references, and features contributed by top evangelical scholars.

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10 Bible Passages and Prayers That Will Impact Your Holy Week

Apr 7, 2019 |

If you’re looking to add variety to your commemoration of Good Friday or your celebration of Easter Sunday, here are a few places to start.

6 Bible Passages:

 

Isaiah 53:3–5

Nothing about Christ’s suffering was fair. What he endured, we deserved.

He is despised and rejected by men,

A Man of sorrows and acquainted with grief.

And we hid, as it were, our faces from Him;

He was despised, and we did not esteem Him.

Surely He has borne our griefs

And carried our sorrows;

Yet we esteemed Him stricken,

Smitten by God, and afflicted.

But He was wounded for our transgressions,

He was bruised for our iniquities;

The chastisement for our peace was upon Him,

And by His stripes we are healed.

John 11:25–26

A simple yes changes everything.

Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in Me, though he may die, he shall live. And whoever lives and believes in Me shall never die. Do you believe this?”

Acts 4:33

The disciples told anyone who would listen what they had seen. God’s grace took it from there.

And with great power the apostles gave witness to the resurrection of the Lord Jesus. And great grace was upon them all.

Luke 24:2–3

If there had been a body in the tomb, the story of Jesus would have ended right then and there. Because the tomb was empty, His story will go on forever.

But they found the stone rolled away from the tomb. Then they went in and did not find the body of the Lord Jesus.

1 Corinthians 15:3–8

The apostle Paul understood the arguments that would be raised to sow doubts about Jesus’ resurrection. He also understood the power of more than five hundred eyewitness accounts of the event.

For I delivered to you first of all that which I also received: that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, and that He was buried, and that He rose again the third day according to the Scriptures, and that He was seen by Cephas, then by the twelve. After that He was seen by over five hundred brethren at once, of whom the greater part remain to the present, but some have fallen asleep. After that He was seen by James, then by all the apostles. Then last of all He was seen by me also, as by one born out of due time.

Romans 6:8–11

Death no longer has any power over those who put their trust in the one who conquered it.

Now if we died with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with Him, knowing that Christ, having been raised from the dead, dies no more. Death no longer has dominion over Him. For the death that He died, He died to sin once for all; but the life that He lives, He lives to God. Likewise you also, reckon yourselves to be dead indeed to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus our Lord.

 

Jesus tomb empty easter

4 Prayers:

 

Christ is Risen: The world below lies desolate
Christ is Risen: The spirits of evil are fallen
Christ is Risen: The angels of God are rejoicing
Christ is Risen: The tombs of the dead are empty
Christ is Risen indeed from the dead,
the first of the sleepers,
Glory and power are his forever and ever

– St. Hippolytus (AD 170–235) 

 

Hymn: Alleluia! Alleluia!

1 Alleluia, alleluia!
Hearts to heaven and voices raise.
Sing to God a hymn of gladness,
sing to God a hymn of praise.
He who on the cross a victim
for the world’s salvation bled,
Jesus Christ, the king of glory,
now is risen from the dead.

2 Alleluia, Christ is risen!
Death at last has met defeat.
See the ancient powers of evil
in confusion and retreat.
Once he died and once was buried;
now he lives forevermore—
Jesus Christ, the world’s Redeemer,
whom we worship and adore.

3 Christ is risen, Christ and first fruits
of the holy harvest field,
which will all its full abundance
at his second coming yield.
Then the golden ears of harvest
will their heads before him wave,
ripened by his glorious sunshine
from the furrows of the grave.

4 Alleluia, alleluia!
Glory be to God on high;
alleluia! to the Savior,
who has won the victory;
alleluia! to the Spirit,
fount of love and sanctity:
alleluia, alleluia!
to the triune Majesty.

– The Exultet

 

How blessed is this day, when earth and heaven are joined and humankind is reconciled to God! May the light of Jesus shine continually to drive away all darkness. May Christ, the Morning Star who knows no setting, find his light ever burning in our hearts—he who gives his light to all creation, and who lives and reigns for ever and ever. Amen.

– Adapted from the Book of Common Prayer – 1979, the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America

 

Almighty God, who hast given thine only Son
to be unto us both a sacrifice for sin,
and also an ensample of godly life;
Give us grace that we may always
most thankfully receive that his inestimable benefit,
and also daily endeavor ourselves
to follow the blessed steps of his most holy life;
through the same Jesus Christ our Lord.

Almighty Father,
who in your great mercy gladdened the disciples
with the sight of the risen Lord:
Give us such knowledge of his presence with us,
that we may be strengthened
and sustained by his risen life
and serve you continually in righteousness and truth;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Living God,
your Son made himself known to his disciples
in the breaking of bread.
Open the eyes of our faith,
that we may see him in all his redeeming work;
who is alive and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.

Almighty Father,
you have given your only Son to die for our sins
and to rise again for our justification:
grant us so to put away the leaven of malice and wickedness
that we may always serve you
in pureness of living and truth;
through the merits of your Son Jesus Christ our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Lord God our Father,
through our Saviour Jesus Christ
you have assured your children of eternal life
and in baptism have made us one with him:
deliver us from the death of sin
and raise us to new life in your love,
in the fellowship of the Holy Spirit,
by the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.

– Church of Ireland

 

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Two Words That Will Prepare You for Holy Week

Holy Week, the last week of Lent, begins on Palm Sunday and ends on Holy Saturday, the day before Easter Sunday. Good Friday is the day that receives the most attention, and for good reason. Yet the entire week offers an opportunity for us to deepen our relationship with Christ and our appreciation for His sacrifice.

With that goal in mind, here are two words to focus on as we prepare our hearts for Holy Week.

Word #1: Empathy

Hebrews 4:15 offers this assurance: “For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin.” Jesus is able can empathize with our human frailties because He became fully human. What we don’t often consider is that the potential for empathy runs both ways. We can’t fathom what it means to be fully God, but we have a pretty good handle on what it means to be fully human. We know all too well what loneliness and dread feel like.

So, we imagine what it must have been like for Jesus to enter Jerusalem on Palm Sunday to the cheers of the crowd—alone in the knowledge that, in a matter of days, the people’s adulation would curdle into disappointment and then hatred. Imagine being able to comprehend the full measure of God’s wrath—which Jesus could do, since He is God—and realizing that wrath would soon be turned against you.

Imagine knowing that, in a matter of hours, you were going to suffer an excruciating death—and having no one to talk to about it, no one to give you comfort. Jesus’ disciples couldn’t seem to grasp what was about to happen, even though Jesus had tried to make them understand time and time again.

When His burden became almost too much to bear, Jesus turned to His three closest friends for help. He asked a simple favor of them: to stay awake and keep watch for those who would betray Him while He focused His attention on the most intense prayer session of His life. All three of them fell asleep.

Jesus watched His followers scatter when His enemies came for Him. He felt the betrayal of Judas Iscariot and the denials of Peter. He was rejected, taunted, and beaten by the human race He had come to save.

The question is, can we feel it? Can we empathize, even slightly, with what Jesus must have experienced? Let that be our first aim this Holy Week.

Word #2: Tension

Let our second aim be to embrace the tension of Holy Week. To do that, we must look at it from a first-century perspective. Easter Sunday is the most joyous day of the Christian calendar. Yet its full impact can’t be felt unless we understand the uncertainty that preceded Jesus’ resurrection. Easter Sunday is the surprise ending to the greatest cliffhanger in human history.

Keep in mind that Jesus’ death was an especially cruel blow to those who had embraced His teachings. Jesus had released them from the burdens of Old Testament law. He had shown them a new way. He had promised everlasting life.

He had given them hope, direction, and purpose.

And when He died, all of that supposedly died with Him. His message was tied to His identity. If He was not who He claimed to be, His promises and the truth He spoke were null and void. If He could be silenced by death, so could everything He stood for.

So, on that Sabbath, the Silent Saturday of Holy Week, all must have seemed lost.

Or almost all.

A flicker of hope remained. Someone paying very close attention would have recognized that the events surrounding Jesus’ death followed a familiar pattern—one that Jesus Himself had predicted. “From that time Jesus began to show to His disciples that He must go to Jerusalem, and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised the third day” (Matt. 16:21).

Someone paying very close attention would have recognized that the fate of humankind hung in the balance that Saturday. The apostle Paul expresses that tension well in 1 Corinthians 15:14: “And if Christ is not risen, then our preaching is empty and your faith is also empty.”

If the grave held Him, all was lost. Death would remain undefeated. There would still be a great chasm between God and humanity. In Israel, the Jewish people would settle back into their religious routines. And the rabbi from Nazareth would be forgotten within a few years.

If, on the other hand, the grave could not hold Him, the world would never be the same.

We can maintain our focus throughout Holy Week by meditating on the tension of if—on everything that hung in the balance between Jesus’ death and resurrection.

 

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What Is Lent and Why Do Christians Practice It?

How Do We Teach People About Easter?

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Finding Hope in the Depths of Grief

Understandably, a thread of grief runs through the gospel account of Jesus’ crucifixion. We’re given glimpses of the people who were closest to Him—snapshots that allow us to imagine their pain and loss. As the story progresses from Good Friday to Easter Sunday, a second thread winds itself into the narrative—a thread of healing and joy.

These two threads continue throughout the New Testament and extend to us some 2,000 years later. Everyone whose hope is in Christ can find comfort and healing by tracing these threads back to their source.

By looking at the grief surrounding Jesus’ death, we can find encouragement to help us cope with our own grief and loss.

 

The Disciples

Imagine the grief of the men who had left everything to follow Jesus. For three years, they had shared in His ministry—the highs and the lows. They had watched Him still a storm at sea with just a few words. They had seen Him cure all manner of sickness and disability. They had been transformed by His teaching. Jesus had impacted each of them in extraordinary ways, and suddenly they were faced with the prospect of life without Him.

Compounding their grief was their realization that Jesus had warned them about what was going to happen—on several different occasions, in fact. Yet they had refused to listen or to accept the literalness of His words. So, when it finally happened—the betrayal, followed by the arrest and the crucifixion—they were caught by surprise. They scattered to save themselves and never had a chance to say their proper goodbyes.

After His resurrection, Jesus appeared to His disciples in a closed room. He spent time with them, helping them overcome their grief and comforting them with His presence. When Thomas, who was not present in the room, later expressed doubts about what the others had seen, Jesus appeared a second time. Thomas’ doubts—and grief—disappeared forever.

Peter

Imagine the grief of Jesus’ closest friend and self-styled protector. Peter’s sense of loss was magnified by his own devastating personal failure. Hours after vowing never to desert the Lord, Peter denied—on three separate occasions—even knowing him. As far as Peter knew, Jesus’ last memory of Him was his betrayal of his vow.

John 21:15–19 records the risen Jesus’ reconciliation with Peter. Three times Jesus asked Peter if he loved Him. Three times Peter replied that he did. And three times Jesus instructed Peter to care for His lambs and sheep. He restored Peter’s heart and soul and prepared him to serve.

Mary 

Imagine the grief of Jesus’ mother. From the time she conceived, Mary understood that her son would be the long-awaited Messiah—Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace (Isa. 9:6).

Yet that didn’t change the fact that He was also her son. She saw nails driven into the hands that she had held when Jesus was a boy. She stood silently while a crowd hurled insults and spewed hatred at her firstborn child. Mary had watched Him draw His first breath, and she watched Him draw His last. Hers was the terrible grief of a mother who lives long enough to see the death of her child.

Hers was also the inexpressible joy of seeing that which she feared lost forever returned to her. When she saw the risen Jesus, those things which she had “pondered . . . in her heart” since his boyhood (Luke 2:19) suddenly took on a new meaning.

Jesus

The grief of His disciples, His closest friends, and even His mother paled in comparison to the grief Jesus Himself experienced when His heavenly Father turned away from Him. On the cross Jesus “became sin”—the object of His Father’s perfect wrath. The intimate fellowship with God that had sustained Jesus throughout His earthly ministry was broken. Jesus felt the full force of God’s abandonment. He was alone in a profoundly disturbing way. His grief pours from His lips as He quotes Psalm 22:1: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

When His sacrifice was completed and God’s plan for salvation was fulfilled, Jesus was restored to fellowship. According to Ephesians 1:20, he sits at the right hand of His Heavenly Father.

Us

Two thousand years later, we come to Good Friday with the benefit of hindsight. We know what happened on Easter Sunday. So, we react to Jesus’ sacrifice not with grief, but with a sense of unworthiness and overwhelming gratitude. Yet we’re no strangers to grief. Where do Jesus’ death and resurrection leave us as we struggle with our own devastating losses?

Because of the events of Good Friday and Easter Sunday, those who put their trust in Jesus will live forever in the presence of our Heavenly Father. We may not be able to wrap our minds around everything that entails, but we do know this: because of Jesus’ redemptive work, “God will wipe away every tear from their eyes; there shall be no more death, nor sorrow, nor crying” (Rev. 21:4).

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How Do We Teach People About Easter?

The story of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection will pique the curiosity of spiritual seekers this Easter season. The question for Jesus’ followers is how to make the most of the opportunity. How can we help people who know little more than the basics of the Easter story understand its full implications? Here are three ideas to get you started.

We Start in the Book of Exodus.

In order to convince Pharaoh, the king of Egypt, to release the Hebrew people from slavery, God sent 10 plagues on Egypt. The tenth and final plague was the death of every firstborn child. The only way for people to escape the plague was to sacrifice an unblemished lamb and paint its blood on the doorposts of their homes. When the angel of death saw the blood of the lamb, it passed over that household. The event came to be known and celebrated as Passover.

Some 1,500 years later, God’s plan of salvation for the human race was unveiled—and it echoed the Passover in Exodus. The key to salvation was the sacrifice of an unblemished lamb—in this case, a perfect representative of the human race. The only way to escape the punishment of death for our sins was to figuratively cover ourselves with the blood of the sacrificial lamb.

We Emphasize That There Was No Other Way.

To people who are unfamiliar with the Bible story, the crucifixion may seem like the very definition of cruel and unusual punishment. They wonder, how could a loving God allow His Son to suffer like that?

The best place to start addressing those concerns is John 14:6. That’s where Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me.” There is no boast or pride in Jesus’ words. He is helping the world understand that only He can bridge the separation between God and humankind.

Sin created the separation. According to God’s plan, only a perfect sacrifice can pay the penalty for sin. But no human has ever been perfect, so God sent His only Son to take on human form and live a sinless life in order to become that sacrifice. Only Jesus’ sacrifice could satisfy God’s perfect justice and holiness. So the way to the Father spoken of in John 14:6 passed through the cross and the tomb.

Only Jesus was able to conquer sin by living an unblemished life. Only Jesus was able to conquer death by emerging from the tomb.

We Align Our Celebration with Scripture.

With so many profound spiritual truths to celebrate, we run the risk of confusing spiritual seekers by including something as frivolous as an imaginary bunny in our Easter traditions. The good news is that profound spiritual truths don’t always have to be celebrated in profound ways. You can have Easter fun with your kids while you focus on spiritual truths.

For example,

  1. Easter eggs, in the Christian tradition, represent Jesus emerging from the tomb—just as a bird emerges from an egg. You can make that connection more obvious by decorating eggs to reflect the biblical narrative. One person might paint a stick-figure scene of Jesus’ followers at His empty tomb. Others might paint the words “He is risen!” “Alive!” and “Rejoice!” on their eggs.
  2. You could plan an unconventional Easter egg hunt. Instead of filling plastic eggs with candy and prizes, fill all but one with cotton balls. Leave the last egg empty to represent Jesus’ empty tomb. The person who finds the empty egg gets a prize. After each hunt, you can switch the eggs and do another one. Afterward, talk about the women who found Jesus’ tomb empty (Mark 16:1–11).
  3. You could start a tradition of waking up at dawn for an Easter Sunday breakfast. You could use Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus” as a wake-up device. Despite the earliness of the hour, foster an atmosphere of joy as you celebrate Jesus’ resurrection together.
  4. Have a contest to see which of your family members can come up with the most creative way to announce, “He is risen!” For example, one of you might fly an indoor drone, trailing a toilet-paper banner with the words written on it. Another might hang a banner from the staircase. Another might write the words in chalk on your driveway.

Help your family understand that profound doesn’t necessarily mean solemn.

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What Is Lent and Why Do Christians Practice It?

The season of Lent begins on Ash Wednesday and ends on Holy Saturday, the day before Easter Sunday. On the calendar that’s a span of 46 days. However, the six Sundays that fall within that span are not counted, which means there are 40 official days of Lent. Those 40 days represent the 40 days Jesus spent in the wilderness fasting and preparing for His public ministry.

For Christians, the season of Lent is a time to prepare for Easter. It’s a time for us to examine ourselves and repent; a time to pray, fast, and deny ourselves; a time to read and meditate on God’s Word.

Lent is a time of great reverence, punctuated by six “mini-Easter” Sundays. During these six interludes, a spirit of joy leavens our solemn observance as we anticipate Christ’s resurrection.

Here are three things to keep in mind as the season of Lent approaches.

Surrender Is Key to Understanding Lent

Throughout His earthly ministry, Jesus surrendered to the will of His Heavenly Father. He taught His disciples to surrender when they prayed to God, “Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven” (Matt. 6:10). Jesus understood better than anyone that surrendering to God’s will is not an easy thing to do. As the events leading to His arrest unfolded, surrender became more and more difficult. The cross loomed—and, with it, unimaginable suffering.

In the Garden of Gethsemane, Jesus poured out His anguish to His Heavenly Father. He even asked that the cup of suffering be taken away from Him. And then He followed it up with the ultimate words of surrender: “nevertheless, not what I will, but what You will” (Luke 22:42).

Jesus’ attitude of obedient surrender was key to God’s plan of salvation. It was also an example for His people to follow.

Lent Is a Communal Experience

In the season of Lent, Christians throughout the world answer the call to surrender. Believers from a variety of denominations and backgrounds—people who have little in common aside from their devotion to Christ—unite in self-reflection to prepare for Easter Sunday. The ways in which they choose to mark the Lent season may differ, but in their commitment to denying themselves and surrendering to God, they share common ground. Lent inspires a powerful spirit of unity among Christ’s followers.

Lent Is an Intensely Personal Experience

Even though “I’m giving it up for Lent” has become a punch line of sorts in our culture, Lent is not a season for commiserating in misery. Everyone who observes Lent does so in an individual manner. Each person charts a unique 40-day spiritual regimen. Many people choose to deny themselves something they love for the duration of the season as they surrender themselves to God.

Whatever we choose to give up—whether it’s chocolate, meat, social media, or something else—the fact that we’re giving it up is a private matter between ourselves and God. No one else needs to know. In fact, no one else should even notice what we’re doing. Jesus Himself said so.

Moreover, when you fast, do not be like the hypocrites, with a sad countenance. For they disfigure their faces that they may appear to men to be fasting. Assuredly, I say to you, they have their reward. But you, when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, so that you do not appear to men to be fasting, but to your Father who is in the secret place; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you openly. (Matt. 6:16–18)

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For additional reading, check out this article on Jesus’ Seven “I Am” Statements.

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ENCOUNTER THE BIBLE ALONGSIDE THE GREAT VOICES OF THE CHURCH, PAST AND PRESENT

THE NKJV ANCIENT-MODERN BIBLE

Many things have changed over the past 2,000 years. The good news of Jesus Christ isn’t one of them.

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